lent 2021

goodfriday_chickadee_812x600 A chickadee perches in a tree on Good Friday of 2014, the day after the ashes of my parents were buried in the plot below its branches.

Lent ushers in hope. As my dad used to observe, the word Lent means “lengthening” — the days get longer, reaching out to the hope of resurrection. May hope sustain you on this Ash Wednesday.

Here are a couple of resources for the season of Lent (more to come):

76 years ago…

John W Emmer, Jra B-24 bomber was shot down by enemy fire over Hansa Bay, New Guinea, carrying my uncle John and 10 other crewmen. They were officially MIA until Good Friday of 2018, when the team of Project Recover discovered the plane nearly 200 feet under the surface of the bay.

I had stopped by the family cemetery plot on that same Good Friday on my way to a prayer vigil in Saint Paul. As I cleared snow from the tombstones, I began thinking about uncle John and how little we knew about him. I decided to walk the cemetery praying a rosary for all the deceased in my family. Little did I know that, on that very day, his plane had been discovered.

gravestone of John Emmer, JrMore details about the discovery, and the consequent gathering of the families of the deceased crew, at the links below.

in memory of uncle John

Heaven Can Wait family gathering (October 2018)

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

-Excerpt from “For the Fallen” by Laurence Binyon

Project Recover: The Finding of ‘Heaven Can Wait’ B-24 from Kyle McBurnie on Vimeo.

NOTE: I’m currently working on a new blog post about Uncle John… specifically, the things I learned from my visit to Omaha in May of 2019 for the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency regional meeting. I was able to sit down with a casualty officer, analyst, and historian to review what they know about what happened to the crew of Heaven Can Wait on March 11, 1944.

Passion Sunday

palm_sunday_rabbit“You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”


https://youtu.be/M_m054tLKvs

stations of the cross hike on Palm Sunday

I’m planning to lead a Stations of the Cross hike at Saint Patrick’s Cemetery in Inver Grove Heights on Palm Sunday (April 5), which is also the day that World Youth Day is celebrated in the local churches of the world.

I’ve chosen this location because a friend of mine, Mary Sandkamp, is buried here. Mary was a member of the Catholic young adult community in the Twin Cities and active in the local chapter of the Frassati Society. Mary died in March of 2016.

If you live in the Twin Cities and are able to attend, you are more than welcome to join me. All appropriate social distancing protocols will be observed. Here are the details:

WHEN: Sunday, April 5, 2020 – 2 pm

WHERE: Cemetery for the Church of Saint Patrick, 10499 Rich Valley Boulevard, Inver Grove Heights, MN (meet inside the entrance on the right side; Mary’s gravesite is adjacent to a series of shrubs in that section of the cemetery. A series of statues of Mary point the way to it.)

WHAT:  Praying the Stations of the Cross. Click here to download/print the prayersI will not be distributing paper copies of the prayers, so please either bring a mobile device or your own printed copy with you.

Before we begin the prayer walk, we’ll read a portion of the message that Pope Francis has written for World Youth Day 2020:

Young man, I say to you, arise!” (Lk 7:14)

Today, we are often “connected” but not communicating. The indiscriminate use of electronic devices can keep us constantly glued to the screen. With this Message, I would like to join you, young people, in calling for a cultural change, based on Jesus’ command to “arise.” In a culture that makes young people isolated and withdrawn into virtual worlds, let us spread Jesus’ invitation: “Arise!” He calls us to embrace a reality that is so much more than virtual. This does not involve rejecting technology, but rather using it as a means and not as an end. “Arise!” is also an invitation to “dream,” to “take a risk,” to be “committed to changing the world,” to rekindle your hopes and aspirations, and to contemplate the heavens, the stars and the world around you. “Arise and become what you are!” If this is our message, many young people will stop looking bored and weary, and let their faces come alive and be more beautiful than any virtual reality.

If you give life, someone will be there to receive it. As a young woman once said: “Get off your couch when you see something beautiful, and try and do something similar.” Beauty awakes passion. And if a young person is passionate about something, or even better, about someone, he or she will arise and start to do great things. Young people will rise from the dead, become witnesses to Jesus and devote their lives to him.

Dear young people, what are your passions and dreams? Give them free rein and, through them, offer the world, the Church and other young people something beautiful, whether in the realm of the spirit, the arts or society.

(source)

on having your world turned upside down

large-wave-capsize-boatOn a day like this, it can feel like everything has been turned upside down… or like the boat you’ve been traveling in has just capsized.

Well, that’s not always a bad thing.

Here’s a talk I gave twelve years ago this week on the value of having everything upset in your life.