Saint Judas

After seeing this story out of Buffalo, New York in yesterday’s news, it seems to me that I need to get my novel and screenplay about seminary life (Saint Judas) written at the first opportunity. As it turns out, life is sometimes more salacious than fiction.

What I learned from my seminary experience was basically this:

1) it was an institution riddled with people who didn’t know who they were

2) since they didn’t know who they were, they were insecure and shifty; in a word: they lacked integrity

3) these people would say one thing and do another, thus fostering a climate of distrust

4) at that point, Satan could schedule a long vacation… he had other people to carry out his charism of sowing division

In shorthand: identity issues led to integrity issues, and integrity issues led to trust issues. It’s as old as Genesis 3.

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Divine Mercy Sunday

Today is Divine Mercy Sunday, a time to remember in a special way the message of our Lord to St. Faustina Kowalska, a simple nun from Krakow in early part of the 20th century.

When I was studying in Europe as part of a semester-abroad program in 1992, I had a chance to visit Krakow and visit the convent where Sister Faustina lived. I remember leaving from Steubenville’s Austrian campus early that day — which meant skipping out of the end of a talk given by Cardinal Schönborn, who was reading to us from the latest draft of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Just one more thing to lay before God’s mercy…

When we arrived in Krakow, it was hard to find Sr. Faustina’s convent — although the fact that none of my classmates spoke Polish might have had something to do with it… We just pulled out our holy cards with the image of the Divine Mercy on it, and first were directed to the wrong church! But we eventually got there, and the sisters were kind enough to show us around… we saw the sisters’ cemetery, the chapel that contains the image, and the tomb of St. Faustina. Here are a few photos…

The sister’s cemetery

Praying at the tomb of St. Faustina

The Divine Mercy image in the chapel

A Polish holy card

stations of the cross hike on Good Friday

I’m planning to lead a Stations of the Cross hike at Resurrection Cemetery in Mendota Heights on Good Friday.

Given the discovery of the Heaven Can Wait aircraft last year on Good Friday, I thought it would be fitting to pray the stations of the cross near the grave site for Uncle John.

If you live in the Twin Cities and are able to attend, you are more than welcome to join me. Here are the details:

WHEN: Friday, April 19, 2019 – 1 pm

WHERE: Resurrection Cemetery, 2101 Lexington Avenue South, Mendota Heights, MN 55120 (meet at the Emmer family gravesite – click here for a map)

WHAT:  Praying the Stations of the Cross. Click here to download/print the prayers.

rest in peace, Mom & Dad

On April 17, 2014 (Holy Thursday that year), the ashes of Mom and Dad were laid to rest in a common grave at Resurrection Cemetery in Excelsior, Minnesota, just across the street from the home on Christmas Lake where they raised all ten of us. April 17 is my mom’s birthday; she died in 2013 on Holy Thursday, and her funeral Mass was celebrated on April 1, my dad’s birthday. Remembering them both with gratitude and love.

James & Mary Emmer

Wedding of James J Emmer & Mary Packard
Crystal, MN
September 2, 1950

James Joseph Emmer
April 1, 1929 – September 23, 2004

Mary Packard Emmer
April 17, 1928 – March 28, 2013

The ashes of both were laid to rest in a simple burial service:

April 17, 2014 – 10 am Central Time

Resurrection Cemetery
5555 Covington Road, Shorewood, MN 55331

Presider: Father Jim Livingston

To all of you who joined us in person, despite the snow:
our sincerest thanks!

laidtorest

Prior obituary notices:

James J. Emmer / Mary P. Emmer

Remembrances by the Emmer kids:

Dad / Mom

Audio:

Related posts:

remembering Pops / celebrating Mom

on the passage through life / seven years

in gratitude for my dad / the Christian life: comfort by way of upset

sshhh…. this letter is an open secret

Hi all you fine clerics of Bavaria, just wanted to be sure you received a copy of the letter from the pope emeritus. Translated into English. JCR (aka PB16) greets you cordially, by the way.

Also, Patrick Madrid does a nice job of explaining what it all means. It’s profound, compelling and nutritious. Enjoy!  If you like what you hear, please consider subscribing to his podcast over at Relevant Radio.

Given in Minnesota, on the 12th day of April, 2019, the 49th year of my insertion into the priesthood of all believers.