in theaters and online today: Fatima

Screen Shot 2020-08-28 at 8.34.52 AMToday, a new film about Fatima opens in theaters and online.

My friend and screenwriting mentor Barbara Nicolosi wrote the original script. There’s a nice article about the film on the website for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis:

Screenwriter Barbara Nicolosi says that redemptive suffering “was absolutely one of the themes” in her original script. She adds that, “the sacrifices of the children were actually as much a miracle and proof of the reality of Fatima as the Miracle of the Sun. After the July apparition [the seers] began to take on extraordinary penances and they would say, ‘For sinners.’ ” It was for this reason Nicolosi first titled the original draft of her script “For Sinners.”

For showtimes and to see which online platforms are making it available to stream, visit the website for the film.

the first casualty of war

Screen Shot 2020-08-26 at 6.52.13 AMI remember one of my high school English teachers explaining to us that truth is the first casualty of war.

Sacrifices during wartime make sense. But if a government makes serious miscalculations about the nature of an enemy and the extent of a threat, and then refuses to face the data, soldiering on with measures that trample over the lives of its citizens, one could be justified in asking if we are being compelled to join in a false crusade with grave consequences to the human family.

If you haven’t yet watched the HBO miniseries Chernobyl, it’s incredibly relevant to this moment.

There are manifold ways to mislead others. One is by understating a threat, and another is by overstating it. Still another is by refusing to change course when the truth appears down an unexpected road. But once the truth reveals itself, and you insist on keeping it concealed: look out. The truth has no regard for your attempts to suppress it. It’s a losing battle every time.

May our first fidelity be to the truth, discovered along the pathways of humility and generosity. Let us be convinced that only on that basis can we serve the common good. All other paths lead to deadly illusions.

the leaf of August

maple_brightMy August flies by
down the street of summer
like an anxious maple leaf
brightened too soon
headed for the pond
where it will soon lie at the bottom
with a hundred other memories.

Why does time
like a wind
pick up in August?
Maybe it’s just my imagination
fueled by the approaching blackboard
feeding on the thrilling anxiety
of another school year.

I’m determined to let my mind
be starved of its fears
so that the tumbling speed of my August
no longer bothers me.
I need only look at the memory-covered bottom
of the pond of my experience
to see a thousand leaves of anxiety
decomposing, losing form.

My task is to enjoy the tumble
of my crisp, bright August
and to let it sink beneath the pond
when Autumn calls my name.

oxymorons and the science of being human

2020 is turning out to be the Year of the Oxymoron:

Flattening the Curve.
Social Distancing.
The New Normal.
Fake News.
Social Media.
Supreme Court Justice.
Artificial Intelligence.
Political Discourse.

If I were a Hollywood studio exec, I’d say this would be the time to re-release Romancing the Stone.

But in all seriosity: One oxymoron in particular deserves our attention.

We asked people to engage in disengagement, coining the oxymoronic phrase social distancing.

The compliance has been remarkable.

I’m not sure why we are surprised by the destruction of other people’s property, violent speech, and other threatening and egocentric behaviors.

Most of the appeals to science were appeals to technology, and very little attention was paid to the science of human behavior. We are social creatures, and we were being asked to violate our nature in the pursuit of some greater good (putting aside the question of whether science suggested that the good in question was achievable or even beneficial). I’m not sure why we expected that to come off without some serious repercussions.

To quote C.S. Lewis in The Abolition of Man, “We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.”

I know there were appeals to altruism in the lockdown (“do it for your neighbor” or “we’re all in this together” or even “you’re not pro-life if you don’t comply”). Instead of appealing to people’s reason, however, or their better instincts, in many situations a play was made to activate a sense of shame in those who asked for a rational discussion. I think that’s a trend that, if not put in check, does not bode well for the future of social change.

“There is a great temptation to say, ‘But there is so much suffering in the world! — let’s suspend the question of truth for a while. First let’s get on with the great social tasks of liberation; then, one day, we will indulge in the luxury of the question of truth.’ In fact, however, if we postpone the question of truth and declare it to be unimportant, we are emasculating man, depriving him of the very core of his human dignity. If there is no truth, everything is a matter of indifference. Then social order swiftly becomes compulsion, and participation becomes violation.” (Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, Behold the Pierced One)

 

on living in a COVID age

Screen Shot 2020-08-08 at 8.04.22 AMIf C.S. Lewis were alive today, I think he’d write an essay something like this:

In one way we think a great deal too much of the coronavirus. “How are we to live in a COVID age?” I am tempted to reply: “Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents.”

In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Believe me, dear sir or madam, you and all whom you love were already sentenced to death before the coronavirus appeared: and quite a high percentage of us were going to die in unpleasant ways. We had, indeed, one very great advantage over our ancestors—anesthetics; but we have that still. It is perfectly ridiculous to go about whimpering and drawing long faces because the scientists have added one more chance of painful and premature death to a world which already bristled with such chances and in which death itself was not a chance at all, but a certainty.

This is the first point to be made: and the first action to be taken is to pull ourselves together. If we are all going to be destroyed by a virus, let that virus when it comes find us doing sensible and human things—praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts—not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about infection. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds.

—  based on the essay “On Living in an Atomic Age” (1948) in Present Concerns: Journalistic Essays